victoriadonelda:

i don’t know what i am doing with my life or my hair

(via fawnkitten)

Jennifer Lawrence’s rep on the photo leak

jenniferlawrencedaily:

"This is a flagrant violation of privacy," Lawrence’s rep told E! News in a statement. "The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence." 

allhailthehutch:

Taking naked pictures of yourself does not make you a bad person. People who share them without your permission are bad people.

(via youaremyholywine)

So Jeniffer Lawrence’s ex sold those pics right? What a fucking fucker whoever it was.

You had this amazing way of shutting out the world when you felt down. But as much as I admired that, I knew the danger. I knew how shutting the world off had damaging effects, long-term.

How being numb meant you didn’t feel the love that whispered at the nape of your neck, the joy that rained on your skin, the peace that filled your lungs.

You’re not wrong for shutting out the world when you’re down, but you miss out on so much more when you allow them to win.

— Dae Lee (Daeizm)

(via beautybehindbars)

erikamoen:

bisexual-books:

All this week we will be highlighting #27BiStories from bisexual Advocate journalist Eliel Cruz with graphics by Trivo Studio 

Part 2 — #27BiStories: When Did You Come Out? What Was The Response Like?

Hoping to shine a light on the myths about the bisexual community — both in and out of lesbian, gay, transgender, and queer spaces — The Advocate has launched a four-part series written from interviews with 27 self-identified bisexuals, all of whom happen to be in relationships. Earlier this week, we asked our sources to confont the biggest misconceptions they face as bisexual people, and today, we’re turning our attention to the “coming out” stories that so often unite members of the LGBT community. 

Do those stories provide the same kind of “we’ve all been there” unity that many in the lesbian, gay, and transgender communities experience when sharing their own coming-outs? Or do bisexual people face ridicule and disbelief from the very people who claim to want to liberate others from the closet? Read on to find out. 

This is #27BiStories. 

Yes, yes, yes, and yes.

At least I knew to expect homophobia when I was in same-sex relationships, I was not prepared at all for the biphobia I’d experience later. Personally, I’ve found the dismissal, accusations, and vitriol I get from the queer side regarding my sexuality to be far, far more hurtful than the harassment and garbage thrown at me I’d get from straight men on the street when I’d walk hand-in-hand with my girlfriend.

You expect it from bigoted strangers, you don’t see it coming from your supposed “community”

(via songofsarcasm)

supersonicart:

Phil Noto!

Recent work by the infallible Phil Noto:

Read More

(via rawranansi)

female-forum:

citylightsdre:

Monica Martin is bae.

Gorgeous

-KL

(via ventureneverlost)

cherry-and-also-bomb:

Read only the purple letters, then only the blue parenthesis, then all together. Coming soon on etsy

Woah

(via themamafox)

teslaarmor:

me: joins tumblr for fun

me: starts to critically analyze almost every aspect of modern society 

(via heyhihellocaroline)

“I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?””

#613: How do I reach out to my friends who have depression? | Captain Awkward

P.S. A lot of people with depression and other mental illnesses have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options. “Wanna get dinner at that pizza place on Tuesday night?” is a LOT easier to answer than “So wanna hang out sometime? What do you want to do?”

(via startrekrenegades)

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
So much this…

When I’m at my worst, just being invited to drive with you while you run errands is often enough to keep me from doing a complete downward spiral, but please don’t guilt people for not being able to hang out… It’s the worst feeling of shame for having depression in the first place on top of worrying that you will lose those you love for being a shitty friend.

(via gallifreyglo)

(via wherehastherumgone)

silverdrake:

The truth is: the show is incredible and Steven Moffat is an ingenious writer and I’m unfortunately involved in an abusive relationship with him. And he occasionally remembers our anniversary or remembers to write a nice episode with John Hurt in it, but usually he will come home drunk and angry and write a season finale that makes absolutely no sense.
(at ~5:45)

One of the best descriptions of a Whovian’s life (or fan of anything Moffat) I’ve found so far.

(via songofsarcasm)